European Representations of death, 1300-1700: a whistle-stop tour- online talk

    European Representations of death, 1300-1700: a whistle-stop tour- online talk

    Human sculpture emacitated in death from top down in stone

    Alice de la Pole (d.1475) self-commissioned transi sculpture in St Mary the Virgin Church, Ewelme © Welch 2021

    Details Price Qty
    Online talk ticketshow details + £6.00 (GBP)  

    • October 27, 2021
      6:30 pm - 7:30 pm
    Human sculpture emacitated in death from top down in stone

    Alice de la Pole (d.1475) self-commissioned transi sculpture in St Mary the Virgin Church, Ewelme © Welch 2021’

     Death in art

    Whilst death as in dying is ubiquitous, the way that cultures understand death varies. In this talk you will explore a range of representations of death in European art and literature between 1300-1700. In terms of art, our speaker will look at memorial effigies, book illuminations, vernacular wall-paintings, and the work of master artists who imaged death as a person.

    Death depicted

    But not all European cultures depicted death visually. so as well as thinking about the subject of death in well-known works such as those by Chaucer and Shakespeare, Dante and Milton.  Our speaker will consider the lesser known Spanish Danca and Polish Master Polikarp which describe death in graphic text. We will find that in some European countries death is gendered male, and in others death is female, but always that death perceptions link intimately to religion, which in Europe was Christianity in a variety of traditions.

    A huge subject area, this talk has to be selective but provides a wide range of representations of death across the 400 years and throughout Europe.

    About our speaker

    Dr Christina Welch lectures at the University of Winchester; to undergraduates on religious studies, and to postgraduates on death studies as part of the Masters degree in Death, Religion and Culture by Distance Learning. She combines the two subject areas in her research on Renaissance-era cadaver sculptures in Britain and Ireland. Follow her on twitter @ChristinaAWelch

    About Arnos Vale Cemetery

    Arnos Vale is a registered charity, receiving no regular council or government funding. Now, more than ever, we are relying on your support. Please help by donating here. Thank you.

    Practical detail

    This talk will be held on Zoom. Once you have registered, a link to the event will be emailed to you, and a reminder link will also be sent 24 hours before. Please contact info@arnosvale.org.uk if you have any issues.

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